If the next month doesn't display, please refresh the page.

Sep
27
Tue
Cake talk: Fabian Walter
Sep 27 @ 14:00 – 15:00

On peer-review refereeing

Dr. Fabian Walter is a Staff Scientist, Group Leader at the Max Planck Institute for Astronomy in Heidelberg, and an International Associate at Dawn.
Dr. Walter also serves as Scientific Editor at the AAS Journals. He will present salient elements of the current refereeing and publication process and lead an informal
discussion on this subject.

Sep
29
Thu
Cake talk (Inclusion, Diversity and Equity): Anita Zanella
Sep 29 @ 14:00 – 15:00

Sonification and Sound Design for Astronomy Research, Education and Public Engagement

Abstract: Over the last ten years there has been a large increase in the number of projects using sound to represent astronomical data and concepts. Motivation for these projects includes the potential to enhance scientific discovery within complex datasets, by utilising the inherent multi-dimensionality of sound and the ability of our hearing to filter signals from noise. Other motivations include creating engaging multi-sensory resources, for education and public engagement, and making astronomy more accessible to people who are blind or have low vision, promoting their participation in science and related careers. I will describe potential benefits of sound within these contexts and provide an overview of the nearly 100 sound-based astronomy projects that we identified. I will discuss current limitations and challenges of the approaches taken and future directions to help realise the full potential of sound-based techniques in general and to widen their application within the astronomy community.

 

Cake talk: Anita Zanella
Sep 29 @ 14:00 – 15:00

Abstract TBA

Oct
6
Thu
Cake Talk: Lily Whitler
Oct 6 @ 14:00 – 15:00

Abstract TBA

Oct
13
Thu
Cake talk: Kartheik Iyer
Oct 13 @ 14:00 – 15:00

Abstract TBA

Oct
26
Wed
Stephen Wilkins : Importance of Forward Modelling @ DTU
Oct 26 @ 15:00 – 16:00

Abstract:  

Nov
16
Wed
Julie Wardlow : Understanding the environments of extreme dusty star-forming galaxies in the distant Universe @ DTU
Nov 16 @ 15:00 – 16:00

Abstract:  

Dec
7
Wed
Liv Hornekær : Interstellar Catalysis – a Route to Molecular Complexity in Space @ DTU
Dec 7 @ 15:00 – 16:00

Abstract: Interstellar space harbours a surprising chemical complexity in spite of the extremely low temperatures and pressures that characterize it. More than 225 different molecules have been detected including both simple molecules such as H2 and water, as well as larger molecules such as C60 and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Even biologically relevant molecules such as glycolaldehyde – a sugar precursor – have been detected. The largest molecular complexity is observed in dense interstellar dust and molecular clouds – the regions where new stars and planetary systems form. Interstellar molecules play a key role in the star and planet formation process and are at later stages delivered to planetary surfaces where they may have contributed to the origin of life. The surprising chemical complexity found in space is thought to be catalyzed by interstellar nanoscale dust grains and large carbonaceous molecules such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Surface science techniques like scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), temperature programmed desorption (TPD) and density functional theory (DFT) allow us to study and model such reactions on surfaces under conditions that mimic those found in interstellar space. The ultimate aim is to determine the degree of chemical complexity attainable via catalytic reactions at 10 K and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. Specifically, we aim to discover whether the molecular building blocks of life – amino acids, dna bases, sugars and fatty acids – can form even before the formation of stars and planets, at the extremely low temperatures and pressures found in interstellar space.